The New York Times and the Palestinian Terrorist; and Dr. Brown Speaks with a Rabbi About Yeshua

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Dr. Brown discusses a recent NYT op-ed piece which the Times failed to mention was written by a convicted Palestinian terrorist; he’ll then talk with an Orthodox rabbi who has some interesting views about Jesus and Messianic Jews; and the phone lines will be open. Listen live here 2-4 pm EST, and call into the show at (866) 348 7884 with your questions and comments.

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4 Comments
  1. Mike, speaking of ommissions or slanting news coverage to promote an agenda like you mentioned about the murderer and the lack of that detail being included in the report, the Fresno terrorist was also reported with desception in mind by the AP (Associated Press). Details below

    ————–
    (excerpt from foxnews.com)

    The Fresno shooting suspect accused of killing three people on Tuesday shouted “Allahu Akbar” when he was taken into custody by law enforcement, according to Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer – but the Associated Press made an editorial decision to print the translation of his words from Arabic to English: “God is great.”

    The Associated Press tweeted on Tuesday afternoon with their translation, despite almost all other news outlets reporting what suspect Kori Ali Muhammad actually said.

    AP Tweet:
    Fresno police say suspect in triple slaying told them he hates white people, shouted “God is great” before killings.
    — The Associated Press (@AP) April 18, 2017

    The AP responded to Fox News’ request for comment, and said they had deleted the tweet and replaced it with a new one:

    AP Tweet:
    We deleted a tweet about a Fresno slaying suspect shouting “God is great.” It failed to note he said it in Arabic. A new tweet is upcoming.
    — The Associated Press (@AP) April 19, 2017

  2. Hello Dr. Brown,

    I was sent a quote after I called the show from Chabad.org which states: “On the verse, “Jerusalem! Built as a city where everyone gathers together” (Psalms 122:3), our Sages comment that Jerusalem binds and unites all of the Jewish people, whereas regarding a snake the verse states, “I will make hatred between you and the woman” (Gen. 3:15) – suggesting that a snake symbolizes the idea of dissension and hatred.” http://www.chabad.org/kabbalah/article_cdo/aid/379615/jewish/55-Snakes-and-Scorpions.htm

    By the way, I think your response very adequately answers the objection. I use you work often to refute countermissionaries and Muslims. I fear that I didn’t communicate my point clearly. If that’s the case, I am suggesting that the usage of zera in Genesis 3:15 in reference to the serpent is metaphorical. Meaning, it’s not the snakes themselves that will be enemies with humanity, or ultimately with Jesus. But, if Jews interpret the serpent to be symbolic of hatred/sin/temptation, then the zera or offspring would be more evil, temptation and etc. So this would be demonstrating, that contrary to countermissionaries who say zera is only ever used to mean biological children or offspring, that it is actually used as a metaphor. That, in addition to the other references you gave in Isaiah 1:4, 14:20, and 57:3-4. That said, and I’m also perfectly content with interpreting it as generation, as in Psalm 22:31, as you mentioned.

    Blessings in the Lord,

    Eric.

  3. Of course I meant, “ultimately with the Messiah.” (Based on the targumic understanding of Genesis 3:15). Hehe, in my mind Messiah = Jesus, but of course when discussing with non-believing Jews, that’s what we’re trying to prove. 🙂

  4. This idea that we cannot keep the commandments and thus this is why Christ came is a later Protestant invention. This is what Martin Luther taught. The Catholic Church teaches that we can and must keep the commandments, that we can and must love God perfectly. Grace enables us to do this. Christ said, “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.” The Lord also said, “If ye love me, keep my commandments.” The ancient Christian faith has always taught that one must keep the commandments in order to have eternal life. Faith alone does not save us (James 2:24).

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