Is Hyper-Grace Good?

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In response to Dr. Brown’s book on Hyper-Grace: Exposing the Dangers of the Modern Grace Message, some of the hyper-grace leaders are saying that grace should be hyper. Are they right? Listen live here 2-4 pm EST, and call into the show at (866) 348 7884 with your questions and comments.

 

Hour 1:

Dr. Brown’s Bottom Line: Grace is wonderful and limitless, but it can be exaggerated and it can be over emphasized.

 

Hour 2:

Dr. Brown’s Bottom Line: It is often a sign of the Father’s love that He rebukes us and corrects us so that we can experience a true and full life!

 

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12 Comments
  1. Dr. Brown,

    I have a question and a comment. First the question. It appears that God promised David there would always be someone on the throne in Israel. Now from the Christian standpoint, Jesus is on that throne right now, so the unconditional promise has not failed. But what about during the exile? There was no one on the throne for 70 years.

    Comment:
    I hear stories of Muslims who have had visions of The Lord and become Christians. I have often wondered why your friend Schmuley has either not been convinced by your better arguments in your debates or also has not had such an encounter. It would appear however, that Schmuley would have a great deal to lose if he were to change his position of Jesus. His position as the most “famous Rabbi” might quickly change in the Jewish community as the most “infamous Rabbi” in the Jewish community. But perhaps there is more afoot here. It is through your debates that many people are hearing of Jesus, giving them the opportunity to weigh the evidence for themselves. Perhaps if Schmuley were to do a 180 on his position, he would simply be ostracized by the Jewish community and many Jewish ears would be closed to him. We see a hint of this as It appears that his book “The Kosher Jesus” was not met favorably by the Jewish community as they would prefer to keep Jesus off the table as a Jew worthy of discussion altogether. While on the other hand if Schmuley persists in opposition to you, the Jewish community will listen to what he has to say, and in his debates, this will necessarily entail listening to the counter arguments, such that Schmuley is ultimately advancing the knowledge of Jesus.

  2. Half a Shekel

    May we all give a half a shekel to the end time movement of YHVH.
    To all the ministries involved Jonathan Bernis, Karl Schneiderman,Michael Brown, Sid Roth, Michael Walker, Bet Tikkun, Jason Sobel, to name only just a few involved in the Messianic ministry of the end times.

    May our half a shekel and prayer be given so that the power of G_d come in and fund these ministries with the fullness of the spirit, to have the funds to do your work amen.

  3. S Johnson

    >>I hear stories of Muslims who have had visions of The Lord and become Christians.

    I have heard the same stories from Muslims and have been part of them, personally.

    I’m not sure what proof they would be to a Jew or any other sceptic.

    A vision is a highly subjective experience that can have tremendous meaning to the person who experienced it but is not any sort of proof to people outside that faith tradition. (or even to a fellow believer, sometimes).

    In my part of the Muslim world, visions were not exclusive to Christian conversion, BTW. I have spoken with several Muslims who had visions — even of Jesus! — that they felt led them into more devotion to Islam.

    Visions are a cultural phenomenon that are pretty common, in my observation.

    TO BE CLEAR — I fully affirm visions of Jesus that leads them into genuine, saving faith!

    The Holy Spirit works within cultural expectations and these “Muslim” visions seem to me like, let’s say, Gideon’s fleece which may have had origins outside of the Jewish faith.

    It doesn’t matter, to me, if such signs are rooted in a cultural practice of another religion. God can still be in it.

  4. It’s a matter of interpretation. Mr. Brown says that hyper-grace advocates are preaching a dangerous doctrine. I’m not sure what he is referring to as hyper-grace. He just mentioned on his radio program those who say the Sermon on the Mount is not binding on Christians today. Ok, there are many who believe this to be true. Chafer, Darby, many who would be labeled as traditional dispensationalists. Men who have done so much for the church and for the gospel, yet Mr. Brown calls them teachers of a dangerous doctrine.

    This coming from a man who accepts the likes of Hinn and others as brothers in Christ? I believe that WTRU needs to pull Mr. Brown from its radio broadcasts. You, Mr. Brown are teaching a dangerous doctrine.

  5. Calvinist version of Hyper-Grace

    When I speak with Calvinist the conversation usually goes in circles with them not even seeing the apparent contradictions in the statements they make.

    They say if the person was really born again he would not be practicing homosexuality for example, a real born again Christian would not be doing that (even though the men will usually excuse their lust for females as being OK, hey every man does it they say, so lusting is OK in their book) but then when pressed they’ll then drop that stance and then say well the homosexual could be in period of extended sin but if he repents before he dies this shows he was really a Christian all along while he was a homosexual but then when pressed further they’ll say he could even have lived several months or years in sin like that, die unrepentant and still go to heaven if he ever had a true born again experience because it is once saved always saved because we all sin and homosexuality just happened to be his sin of choice and sin can not negate our salvation.

    They give the appearance of preaching holiness but with Calvinism the sin unto death is physical death, that is if a Christian sins way too much and won’t repent that God will take this person to heaven so this person won’t be a bad Christian witness because they don’t view that a believer can die spiritually from sinning. For example John MacArthur who is a Calvinist in The MacArthur Study Bible says on page 1927 in his comment on James 1:15 that “While sin does not result in spiritual death for the believer, it can lead to physical death (1 Cor. 11:30; 1 John 5:16).” and John MacArthur’s comment on Page 1974 1 John 5:16,17 says “Such a sin could be any premeditated and unconfessed sin that causes the Lord to determine to end a believer’s life. It is not one particular sin like homosexuality or lying, but whatever sin is the final one in the tolerance of God. Failure to repent of and forsake sin may eventually lead to physical death as a judgment of God (Acts 5:1-11, 1 Cor. 5:5, 11:30)”

    Calvinist will say God requires holiness and then say we sin hundreds of times every day in thought, word and deed and they have God killing people and taking them to heaven because they are sinning too much. Such a view of grace is a license to sin.

  6. Kenneth,

    It seems you have a wrong impression of Dr. Brown. Read his book on “Hyper Grace”. I think it will clear things up for you.

  7. It seems to me that so often this is where the problem is: It’s how we hear as much as how someone may speak of such things as grace.

    It’s true that grace may be spoken of wrongly.
    It’s just as true that we may hear what others say, wrongly.

    So if we hear someone say that it’s impossible to disappoint God, are they saying that it is impossible to frustrate him, or are they saying that there is nothing we can do that will defeat his plan, as if there is nothing we can do that will cause his sending his own Son into this world, to be of no avail or benefit to us, or are they saying that as children of God, there is nothing we can do that will cause God to wish he never had us as children because we have let him down so badly?

    Or, are they saying that God’s love for us is so great and his knowledge of us so far reaching, that there is nothing we have done or will ever do that will go beyond his expectations of us, whether they be good or evil?

    Are they saying that God knows us so well and what we are capable of, (whether those things be good or evil) that he will never be dismayed, or give up on us because of how we have fallen short, and that he will never cease to know we need his salvation, even though we have done so well?

    When I hear what one man says another man says, or is saying, I don’t think I should be very quick to trust it, and I think I should wonder, if the other man would completely agree with the other’s interpretation or representation of the things he said.

    If a man is holding a two edged sword, shouldn’t he consider that while one edge is facing outward, the other edge is facing toward himself?

    I suppose this is why we are told to be quick to hear and slow to speak. (James 1:19)

    On the one hand, I remember how God said that it repented of him to have made man,(Gen 6:6) and yet I am reminded of his love and grace, and that nothing man has ever done, prevented him from sending his only begotten Son, at the time he sent him.

  8. “Do we then nullify the law by this faith? Not at all! Rather, we uphold the law.” Romans 3:31

    By faith we delight in following God’s law because we want to live justly according to his will and not man’s.

  9. I think the labels of “hyper-grace” vs “hypo-grace” miss the issue.

    Clearly, the grace of God is “hyper” or “uber” or “ultra” or “mega” or “massive” or whatever superlative you want to use.

    The problem is when one uses that Grace as an excuse to sin.

    Paul could not have been more clear about the wrongness of that.

  10. Unfortunately, many use the blood of the lamb as a free pass to disregard all standards of holiness. That is the problem with these “hypergrace” messages. Too much sugar and not enough tea. God requires more than just a “belief” in His son.

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